ICE 4 - Johanna Mestorf

The Deutsche Bahn AG Chooses the First German Female Professor of Archaeology as a Name Giver for a New ICE-4 Train.

     Photo of Johanna MestorfICE 4

The Deutsche Bahn AG intends to name an ICE of the newest generation after the notable archaeologist Johanna Mestorf (1828–1909). At Kiel University in 1899, Mestorf was appointed as the first female honorary professor of Prussia.

Within the scope of a nationwide search for the names of 100 new ICE-4 trains, the Deutsche Bahn AG received more than 2500 suggestions, from which a jury selected 100 historic personalities. The Deutsche Bahn is planning to put the 100 new ICE-4 trains into service by 2023. After a review of the name rights, it will christen the new trains with the selected names. On the initiative of Dr. Julia Katharina Koch (CAU Kiel), a number of persons from the university, among them Prof. Claus von Carnap-Bornheim (Schleswig) and Prof. Johannes Müller (Kiel), as well as persons from public life, including the Minister-President of Schleswig-Holstein, Daniel Günther, campaigned for Mestorf, who was born more than 110 years ago in Bramstedt.

Still largely unknown to the public, Johanna Mestorf was one of the first female directors of a museum in Preußen at that time. She influenced archaeological research in Germany and Scandinavia through numerous excavations and publications. Johanna Mestorf is the name giver of the Johanna Mestorf Academy (JMA), which supports the Cluster proposal “ROOTS – Social, Environmental, and Cultural Connectivity in Past Societies” under the direction of Prof. Johannes Müller within the framework of the Excellence Initiative of the German Research Foundation (DFG).

Links:
Deutsche Bahn – https://inside.bahn.de/ice4-zugtaufe/

News

Publications

  • March 26, 2018

    New Publication
    Taylor et al 2018 - Nature Scientific Report

    Hermes T.R., Frachetti M.D., Bullion E.A., Maksudov F., Mustafokulov S., Makarewicz C.A., 2018: Urban and nomadic isotopic niches reveal dietary connectivities along Central Asia’s Silk Roads, Nature Scientific Reports, Article number: 22995. doi: 10.1038/srep 54888.

    March 21, 2018

    New Publication
    Groß_et_al_2018_picture
    Groß D., Zander A., Boethius A., Dreibrodt S., Grøn O., Hansson A., Jessen C., Koivisto S., Larsson L., Lübke H., Nilsson B., 2018: People, lakes and seashores: Studies from the Baltic Sea basin and adjacent areas in the early and Mid-Holocene, Quaternary Science Reviews 185, 27-40. doi: 10.1016/j.quascirev.2018.01.021.

    January 08, 2018
    New Publication
    Examples of settlement plans in Central and Southeast Europe.
    M. Wieckowska-Lüth, S. Solheim, A. Schülke, W. Kirleis, 2018: Towards a refined understanding of the use of coastal zones in the Mesolithic: New investigations on human–environment interactions in Telemark, southeastern Norway. Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports 17 (2018) 839-851. doi:10.1016/j.jasrep.2017.12.045

    October 23, 2017

    New PublicationsMüller_2017_Bild
    Müller J., 2017: From the Neolithic to the Iron Age – Demography and Social Agglomeration. The Development of Centralized Control, in Fernández-Götz M. and Krause D. (eds.), Eurasia at the Dawn of History. Urbanization and Social Change, New York, Cambridge University Press, 106–124.

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