Upcoming Biweekly Colloquia

Biweekly Colloquia: “Struggles for resources in the past: Socio-cultural and environmental perspectives”


Lectures by international invited experts from different disciplines presenting their research on specific topics: Mondays, 4:15 PM, on a biweekly basis. Organised by the Cluster of Excellence ROOTS & the CRC 1266.

Topic of the winter term 2021/22 is “Struggles for resources in the past: Socio-cultural and environmental perspectives”

To give external listeners access to the biweekly colloquia, they will be either in hybrid form or as a virtual event. Audience members who will attend in person must register in advance; due to the COVID-19 pandemic, attendance is still limited. Online participants can receive access to the Zoom web conferencing system from the Office Teams. Instructions on registering and setting up Zoom for CAU staff can be obtained from the CAU's computer centre website. External colleagues can participate in the Biweekly Colloquia with the free version of Zoom by using the access information sent to them.

The Biweekly Colloquia will take place, as usual, on Mondays from 16.15-17.45 in Leibnizstraße 1 at room 204. The lectures will be streamed live and will be followed by a discussion session between all participants.

Access authorisation: If you would like to access the virtual Biweekly Colloquia or register for the face-to-face event, please contact office@sfb1266.uni-kiel.de or office@roots.uni-kiel.de.

Poster Biweekly Colloquia winter term 2021/22

Biweekly Colloquium: “Nuna Nalluyuituq (The Land Remembers): Combining ethnographic inquiry and remote sensing to study traditional Yup’ik subsistence in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta” (Prof. Dr. Sean Gleason)

Nov 08, 2021 from 04:15 AM to 05:45 AM

Hybrid Meeting (Leibnizstraße 1, R. 204/Online)

Prof. Dr. Sean Gleason  •  Hampden-Sydney College, Virginia

Nuna Nalluyuituq (The Land Remembers): Combining ethnographic inquiry and remote sensing to study traditional Yup’ik subsistence in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta
This lecture outlines a collaborative, multidisciplinary approach to the study of Yup’ik subsistence in Southwest Alaska's Yukon-Kuskokwim (Y-K) Delta. Because distinctive vegetation patterns appear on ancestral cultural sites during the summer months, the analysis of multispectral imagery in combination with local Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) is useful for classifying, documenting, and studying the cyclical, year-long practice of Yup’ik subsistence known collectively as Yuuyaraq (trans. “The way we genuinely live”).  In sum, this lecture highlights the role of Yuuyaraq in past Yup’ik societies before considering how these practices have changed and what ethnographic inquiry and remote sensing can tell us today about these changes.

 

 

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Biweekly Colloquium: “Persistence, Land Use and Sustainability: Exploring Long-term Trends in Urban Duration in the Fertile Crescent” (Prof. Dr. Dan Lawrence)

Nov 22, 2021 from 04:15 PM to 05:45 PM

Virtual Meeting

Prof. Dr. Dan Lawrence  •  Department of Archaeology, Durham University

Persistence, Land Use and Sustainability: Exploring Long-term Trends in Urban Duration in the Fertile Crescent


The Fertile Crescent, encompassing present-day Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Palestine, Jordan and southeast Turkey, saw the emergence of the world’s first indigenous urban communities ca. 6,000 years ago, with cities a feature of the region ever since. These developed in diverse environmental settings, including the dry-farming plains of Northern Mesopotamia, the irrigated alluvium of Southern Mesopotamia and the more variegated landscapes of the Levant. The emergence of cities also coincides with a decoupling of settlement and climate trends, suggesting urbanism may have enhanced the adaptive capacity of societies to withstand changing climatic conditions. Urban forms followed a variety of different trajectories, with a much more sporadic and episodic history in the dry farming plains of the North and West of the study region compared to the stable build up in the irrigated South. In this paper we use a dataset of several thousand urban sites spanning the entire region and dating from the earliest urban forms to later territorial empires, to examine trends in urban sustainability through time. We use duration of occupation as a proxy for sustainability and compare urban trajectories at a variety of scales. Such an approach allows us to examine the relationships between city size, environmental conditions, infrastructural investment and urban sustainability. Our results show that the millennial timescales available through archaeology can allow us to identify the sorts of political, social, and ecological conditions required for urban sites to persist through time.

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Biweekly Colloquium: “Conjunctions and Disjunctions in Interpretations of European Iron Age Socio-temporal Meshworks” (Prof. Dr. Bettina Arnold)

Jan 17, 2022 from 04:15 PM to 05:45 PM

Prof. Dr. Bettina Arnold  •  Department of Anthropology, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Conjunctions and Disjunctions in Interpretations of European Iron Age Socio-temporal Meshworks


The archaeological record presents us with a conflated material record of interactions that are the product of horizontal meshworks at several geographic scales simultaneously. In addition to temporalities that reflect potentially different meshworks depending on the archaeological context in question (settlement vs. mortuary deposits, for example), these interactions were engaged in by actors belonging to different social categories based on age, gender, role and status. While some individuals may have moved vertically between these layers of relational systems most did not and yet we analyze the material traces of the interactions that occurred in Iron Age contexts as though they occurred within a single relational plane. Based on the extensive data sets and new methodologies now available to us it has become clear that interaction and mobility patterns were differentiated along several different axes geographically, temporally and socially. We must find ways of distinguishing between these conjunctive and disjunctive planes to develop a more complete picture of the various modes of early Iron Age communication and interaction. It should be possible to develop a more nuanced approach to this interpretive challenge with specific reference to the still emerging and by now quite extensive mortuary evidence from the West Hallstatt area, which will serve as the case study for this presentation.
 

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Biweekly Colloquium: “Things and Monuments as Resources of Sociality. On Social Transformations in Etruria and the Magna Graecia in the First Millennium BC” (Dr. Beat Schweizer)

Jan 31, 2022 from 04:15 PM to 05:45 PM

Virtual Meeting

Dr. Beat Schweizer  •  Institute of Classical Archaeology, Eberhard Karls University Tübingen

Things and Monuments as Resources of Sociality. On Social Transformations in Etruria and the Magna Graecia in the First Millennium BC

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